Success with High-Benefit Lighting?

May 2010 – National Lighting Bureau
If modification of an existing lighting system or installation of a new one has improved productivity, increased retail sales, or achieved other bottom-line benefits, enter the High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program

The National Lighting Bureau’s 31st annual High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program is under way. If you’ve been involved in a project that makes use of high-benefit lighting, make sure you enter the project for consideration.

The National Lighting Bureau coined the term “high-benefit lighting” to indicate “function-focused” electric-illumination systems designed to fulfill the specific purposes for which they will be used – especially to maximize bottom-line returns for those who own, manage, and/or rely on the lighting.

High-benefit lighting installed in workspaces can help people work faster because it comprises electric illumination designed for the specific space, tasks, and people involved. Just a 1-percent productivity improvement can save an employer $300 annually for each worker who is paid $30,000 per year. The cost of the electric energy the employer spends to provide electric illumination to an employee? Probably less than $50 each year.

Outdoors, high-benefit lighting can help prevent accidents of all types, thus preventing the losses associated with filing insurance claims, absenteeism, administrative paperwork, accident clean-up, negative publicity, and litigation. Fewer accidents can also result in lower insurance premiums. In retail situations, better lighting can improve customer attraction and stimulate purchasing.

For consideration in the 2010 High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program, your entry must be received by Oct. 31, 2010. The entry should document how modification of an existing lighting system or installation of a new one improved productivity, increased retail sales, or achieved any of the many other bottom-line benefits of high-benefit lighting.

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